Tooth Extractions

A tooth that is severely damaged may need to be removed.
 
Before removing your tooth, your dentist will give you a local anesthetic to numb the area where the tooth will be removed. are other types of sedation that can be used along with the local anesthetic.
 
After the tooth is removed, you may need stitches. You can gently bite down on a cotton gauze pad placed over the wound to help stop the bleeding. The removed tooth can be replaced with an implant, a denture, or a bridge.

What To Expect After Surgery

In most cases, the recovery period lasts only a few days. The following will help speed recovery:


Take medications as prescribed by your dentist.
Rinse your mouth with warm salt water several times a day to reduce swelling and relieve pain.
Make your own salt water by mixing 1tsp (5g) of salt in a medium-sized glass [8fl oz] of warm water.
Change gauze pads before they become soaked with blood.
Relax after surgery. Physical activity may increase bleeding.
Eat soft foods, such as gelatin, pudding, or a thin soup. Gradually add solid foods to your diet as
healing progresses.
Do not lie flat. This may prolong bleeding. Prop up your head with pillows.
Avoid rubbing the area with your tongue.
Continue to carefully brush your teeth and tongue.
The dentist will remove the stitches 5 to 7 days after the procedure.

Multiple Teeth Extraction

When the decision has been made that the remaining teeth are non-salvageable and indicated for extraction in preparation for the transition to a full denture, there are two basic alternatives.  The first one would be to extract the remaining teeth, and wait several weeks or months for the areas to heal before making the denture.  Most people usually don't choose this option because it means that they will have to function without any teeth during this time.  As you would expect, most patients would find this objectionable, and therefore in most cases, this is not the chosen alternative. The other alternative, which is the far more popular choice is that of an immediate denture.

In many cases, the immediate denture will indeed be the final denture, although in most cases it will require modification several months down the line to accommodate the changes that occur in the shape of the gums and bone during the healing process.  In other cases, the dentist may decide that the best course of action would be to make the immediate denture a temporary denture, and then make  the permanent denture later on after the gums and bone have fully healed.

After the denture is placed, there is a normal settling process that takes place, usually beginning in the first few days after the surgery. This settling of the denture may cause small pressure sores to develop.  Your dentist will see you for regular visits after placement of   the  denture, and the areas where the denture is rubbing excessively are trimmed and smoothed. These sores will heal, but the denture may continue to settle, and new sore spots may develop.  This is normal, and adjustments may be required for up to the first month following placement of the denture.

If you’re in Perth Amboy or surrounding areas, stop by our practice and we will help you out with your multiple teeth extractions. Dr. George Likakis will let you know if you need multiple teeth extractions or not. Give us a call at 732.826.6900 or use our contact form to request a callback.

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